Garden Pond Dragonflies

WHEN: 03 June 2018

After building a small pond last year in our mini wildlife garden the range of insect species has expanded dramatically. Where previously we had only seen Common Blue Damselflies, we now have Large Red and Blue Tailed damsels as well as Common Darter dragonflies. If you have the space to do it adding a pond can seriously help encourage wildlife.

Common Darter

Nikon D500, Nikon 70-200mm F2.8 VRII + TC-17E II at 340mm (510mm equiv.) – F10, ISO 500, 1/500 sec.

I had hoped our little pond would be big enough to attract dragonflies, I was very excited to see this dragonfly emerging this weekend. Turns out even small ponds can attract Common Darters.

Large Red Damselfly

Nikon D500, Nikon 300mm F4 PF + TC-17E II at 500mm (750mm equiv.) – F10, ISO 640, 1/250 sec.

I had to merge 2 images to get the main body of the damselfly in focus. Especially pleased with the composition of this one.

Blue Tailed Daselfly

Nikon D500, Nikon 300mm F4 PF + TC-17E II at 500mm (750mm equiv.) – F8, ISO 500, 1/1000 sec.

I had hoped this was a Scarce Blue Tailed Damselfly, it would appear not to be the case. Still an unusual visitor for our garden.

Common Blue Damselfly

Nikon D500, Nikon 70-200mm F2.8 VRII + TC-17E II at 340mm (510mm equiv.) – F10, ISO 500, 1/500 sec.

As an added bonus a few days after taking the above pictures another new damslefly species for the garden appeared. A female banded damselfly, I normally see these in massive numbers down by the River Blackwater throughout the summer, a bit unusual as a garden visitor.

Female Banded Damselfly

Nikon D500, Nikon 300mm F4 PF + TC-17E II at 500mm (750mm equiv.) – F10, ISO 500, 1/1250 sec.

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